Friday, 3 September 2010

Greenwood yarn from start to finish...

I've been working on a yarn in between other projects and it's finally finished! Greenwood is 82.5metres of coreless corespun squidgyness...
Greenwood yarn

I took photos of all the processes involved in making this yarn, although there weren't too many since I used fibres that were already prepared and dyed. Hopefully I'll soon be documenting the transition from raw fleece to yarn via the many fibre prep tasks I've been learning about recently!

One of my favourite stages in creating a yarn is going through my stash to assemble all the lovely goodies it will be spun from...
Greenwood batt ingredients
Mmm... so many lovely silky soft shades of green!

As well as several (eight!) shades of dyed Merino wool, I picked out hand dyed silk from Fyberspates, hand dyed soya bean fibre (soysilk) and hand dyed uncarded bamboo fibre from FeltstudioUK, dyed banana threads and some gorgeous undyed naturally coloured fibres including baby camel (golden brown), soya bean (pale gold) and seaweed (also called seacell, a creamy gold colour). You can click on the picture above to see the notes on the photo and find out what's what.

Once all the ingredients are assembled, they get fed into my drum carder...
Greenwood batt on the carder

Lots of carding eventually results in a nice squishy pile of batts (with my trusty Louet drumcarder lurking in the background)...
Pile of Greenwood batts in front of the carder

I love batts...
Five Greenwood batts

Batt close up...
Greenwood batts detail

Next comes the spinning and I forgot to get pictures of how I tear the batts up into strips so I'll make sure I do that next time. All I got was a snap of the yarn on the bobbin part way through the spin...
Greenwood yarn on the bobbin

This yarn was spun using the 'coreless corespun' technique, which sounds a bit self-contradictory but its just a different version of corespinning where you spin fibre onto a core thread at an angle and get a lovely light yet bulky yarn. When you corespin without a core, you're making the core as you go along by tearing a little of the batt with one hand, letting it spin and then feeding the rest of your fibre on at an angle... all at once! It's quite literally a handful (two hands full!) and takes a bit of practice to get the hang. Esther, the very talented spinner behind Jazzturtle Creations did a fantastic video on coreless corespinning here.

So here's the finished yarn...
Greenwood yarn detail

Greenwood yarn strands

I only used two of the batts so I've got plenty left to make some more if it's needed! I'm hoping it's going to a friend of mine to be made into a little baby-sized cardigan :)

3 comments:

  1. amazing - did you Z-strip the batts or just tear strips down the length? and if so, do you mix the strips up or spin whatever you pick up first? ie how do you decide which colours go where? thanks!

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